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NY media reporters NEED to brush up on transit history

 
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NEW YORK OMNIBUS 2629




Joined: 18 Dec 2007
Posts: 7056
Location: NEW JOISEY

PostPosted: Fri Oct 25, 2019 4:28 pm    Post subject: NY media reporters NEED to brush up on transit history Reply with quote

All:

On EYEWITNESS NEWS earlier (ABC 7), reporter Tim Fliescher (whom I've watched for years) reported on the falling of debris (onto a woman's car; thankfully, she was not injured) at the Myrtle Avenue-Broadway (BMT) elevated subway station.

In his most recent report, Mr. Fliescher referred to the remaining Myrtle Avenue "stub" as "part of a decommissioned subway line."

A "SUBWAY" line??

As, of course, we here all know, that was strictly an ELEVATED line, which carried WOODEN El cars, and NOT steel subway trains!

It never ceases to amaze me how little otherwise NY-savvy news reporters are when it comes to transit lines and their history, when covering a news story.

Not that I am at all a male chauvanist, many times the female reporters will know even less about transit/railroads, etc, than their not-too-informed male counterparts; one female reporter once referred to a locomotive as an "engine car", and the last car of a commuter train as a "caboose"!

Come on here, now!

One reporter., years ago, on WCBS (2), when describing an articulated bus involved in some sort of altercation: "......as you can see here, these buses are made up of two sections that are connected by this big accordian...."

"ACCORDIAN"??

Not a trombone or a clarinet??

And THESE are PROFFESIONALS??

The BEST was about 20 years ago, when a (male) reporter (this MIGHT have been on WNEW/FOX 5) referred to the pantograph safety gates between two Redbird cars as "COUPLERS"(!!)

Obviously, there are VERY few transit buffs/historians within the ranks of New York-area news reporters........ Sad

"NYO"
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NEW YORK OMNIBUS 2629




Joined: 18 Dec 2007
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PostPosted: Fri Oct 25, 2019 4:43 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Recalling the days when Old Looks and the RTS once rumbled beneath the shadowy, sinewy struts of the old "Myrt"...........

http://bus.nycsubway.org/perl/show?3987

http://www.subwaynut.com/bmt/myrtlej/myrtlej20.jpg

(courtesy: bus.nycsubway.org/the subway nut.com)
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W.B. Fishbowl



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PostPosted: Sat Oct 26, 2019 9:13 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Such dead-wrong terminologies are not limited to transit coverage. There were at least two reports over the last several months of people killed in hit-and-runs where witnesses said the victims "fell to the floor." Ahem . . . outside, it's either the street or the pavement (which I use in lieu of the word "sidewalk," having been twice to London, England, in 1989 and 1990), or if near where trees are planted, the soil. (Either which way, outside it'd be "ground" anyway.) A lot of people those days don't even venture outside all too much.
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NEW YORK OMNIBUS 2629




Joined: 18 Dec 2007
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PostPosted: Sat Oct 26, 2019 1:49 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

W.B. Fishbowl wrote:
Such dead-wrong terminologies are not limited to transit coverage. There were at least two reports over the last several months of people killed in hit-and-runs where witnesses said the victims "fell to the floor." Ahem . . . outside, it's either the street or the pavement (which I use in lieu of the word "sidewalk," having been twice to London, England, in 1989 and 1990), or if near where trees are planted, the soil. (Either which way, outside it'd be "ground" anyway.) A lot of people those days don't even venture outside all too much.


W.B:

I hear ya!

In Britain, "SUBWAY" refers to an underground passageway connecting either Tube or main line station platforms; oddly, in Glasglow, the tube is known by the American term, "SUBWAY"!

Being greatly interested in London bus (and Underground) history, I am certainly no stranger to British terminology

Regarding buses, here, at home, a BUS is a BUS, no matter where it operates.

In England,however, there is a strong distinction; a BUS is a "city" vehicle, whereas a "coach" would denote an inter-city conveyance.

I always found this interesting!

"NYO"
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GBL Rebel
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PostPosted: Sun Nov 10, 2019 10:02 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Whoa, you want a news reporter to accurately report the news? You would have an easier task teaching a dog to use a toilet!
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NEW YORK OMNIBUS 2629




Joined: 18 Dec 2007
Posts: 7056
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PostPosted: Sun Nov 10, 2019 1:56 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

GBL Rebel wrote:
Whoa, you want a news reporter to accurately report the news? You would have an easier task teaching a dog to use a toilet!


GBL:

Gadzooks! Shocked

How ABSURD of me to even toy with the notion of a news reporter accurately reporting the news! Shocked

That the one "Eyewitness News" reporter referred to the small section of the old Myrtle Avenue El still standing as "part of a defunct SUBWAY line" told me right off the bat that this otherwise-knowledgeable fellow was NOT a transit buff/historian! Rolling Eyes

Not to mention knowing virtually about New York history!

Ya gotta wonder........... Rolling Eyes

"NYO"
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GBL Rebel
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PostPosted: Sun Nov 10, 2019 3:26 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

At the bare minimum someone should double check facts before reporting as trustworthy. Unfortunately, it’s down to giving B.S. to the sheep for them to follow.

A guy on another board had a tag on the bottom of his posts. Like him or not, he was right with that tag. “Take Pride” is something that has drifted away now a days. Kind of like a carpenter, “measure twice, cut once”, this would be the pride in bring a correct story into X number of houses.

I tell guys I work with when they make a major screw up, when management asks who taught you how to do that, don’t say my name, I wouldn’t have f***ed up like that.
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NEW YORK OMNIBUS 2629




Joined: 18 Dec 2007
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PostPosted: Sun Nov 10, 2019 4:17 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

GBL:

I read you LOUD and CLEAR ("TAKE PRIDE")!

One only has to look at the craftsmanship and superb carpentry skills that went into the designing and construction of wooden El cars, many of which ran for over 50 years (recall, also, the elaborate wooden cabin work on the steam-powered Staten Island, Erie-Lackawnna, and CNJ ferryboats, which were in use well into the 1960's)

Speaking of pride, one only has to go underground and look at the original mosaic and tile work found in the oldest subway stations today; no plastic, fiberglass, stainless steel, or "artsy-fartsy" pseudo artwork.

These underground masterpieces indeed reflect a long-ago, long-dead age where PRIDE and CRAFTSMANSHIP walked together hand in hand.

Indeed, most folks in general took pride in ANY job they did (recall, long ago, many "hacks" were wearing a tie behind the wheel)

Many bus drivers presented a military appearance, back in the days of uniforms, which included dress shirts, ties, and caps.

My late mother (who passed away at age 99 three years ago) always said:

"ANY job does with PRIDE is a job WELL done."

How right Mom was!

"NYO"

Too, there is Little pride these days regarding "preservation" (no...we STILL did NOT learn from the wanton destruction of the original 1910 Penn Station)

Go to Rome, and see the Collesium, still standing (albeit not in "pristine" condition!); go to Queens and find that Shea Stadium, the home of the Amazin' Mets for decades, and see, despite its modern architecture, has been demolished and replaced by the generic "Citi Field".

Shea only stood for several decades before being razed.

"Shea" still (IMHO) has a historic "ring" to it; "Citi Field" simply has a modern-day "corporate" sound to it.

Thank God for the late Jackie Kennedy Onassis, who fought (and won) the battle over the fate of Grand Central, along with her contingent of influential politicians and celebrities.

However, when one thinks about it, if an individual has little or no pride in himself, that is certainly going to be reflected in his work, whatever it may be.
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W.B. Fishbowl



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PostPosted: Wed Nov 13, 2019 12:19 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

NEW YORK OMNIBUS 2629 wrote:
In Britain, "SUBWAY" refers to an underground passageway connecting either Tube or main line station platforms; oddly, in Glasglow, the tube is known by the American term, "SUBWAY"!

Being greatly interested in London bus (and Underground) history, I am certainly no stranger to British terminology

I've been on the Underground trains. Certainly more roundish than our own subway rolling stock. I vividly remember their exits, marked "Way Out."
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NEW YORK OMNIBUS 2629




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PostPosted: Wed Nov 13, 2019 12:35 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

W.B. Fishbowl wrote:
NEW YORK OMNIBUS 2629 wrote:
In Britain, "SUBWAY" refers to an underground passageway connecting either Tube or main line station platforms; oddly, in Glasglow, the tube is known by the American term, "SUBWAY"!

Being greatly interested in London bus (and Underground) history, I am certainly no stranger to British terminology

I've been on the Underground trains. Certainly more roundish than our own subway rolling stock. I vividly remember their exits, marked "Way Out."


W.B.:

In London, there are actually TWO Underground systems; one is a "sub-surface" system, with equipment more in sync with some American rapid transit rolling stock.

The deep level "tubes" are quite squat in size and contour; I've seen LT yard photos showing a Tube train alongside a train of "sub-surface" cars....the "tube" train also looks quite toylike in comparison!

On an interesting note, a number of the earliest MU "tube stock" in London (circa 1905) were built here in the States by ACF, then were shipped to Great Britain in a disassembled state, and re-assembled there.

In fact, ACF later built a plant in Great Britain.

Today, foreign-built rapid transit equipment is the norm; but, prior to the Second World War, many London tube cars were also built in France, Belgium, and Hungary.

The earliest MU tube stock had "driving motors" at each end, with trailers in between. The motors had all electrical gear located behind the cab, and took up a good portion of these units.

It was not until the 1938 stock arrived that all electrical gear was placed under the car floors, freeing the entire body of the car for carrying passengers.

The earliest cars were known as "gate stock", as they had gates at each end, manned by guards (conductors); prior to WW1, some stock was being converted into air-door cars.

The first new stock to be built with air-operated doors arrived in 1923, and went into service on what is today's Northern Line.......

'NYO"
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NEW YORK OMNIBUS 2629




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PostPosted: Wed Nov 13, 2019 1:07 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

W.B.:

I think you'll find this interesting:

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/London_Underground_rolling_stock

Many good photos on this page (both historic and current)

Note also the size difference between the squat deep-level "tube" stock and the "District" equipment........

(Glasgow's "SUBWAY" also operates very squat trains; this circular line originally used cable traction, but, in 1935, the little trains were electrified)
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NEW YORK OMNIBUS 2629




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PostPosted: Wed Nov 13, 2019 1:15 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

A bit of Brooklyn in London?

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/London_Underground_Q_Stock

Closeup front end views of the clerestory cars (which can be found elsewhere on the 'net) bear a resemblence to the BMT's articulated "D"-type Triplex units, sans sign boxes.

Note the 1955 photo showing a "District" line train at Gunnersbury; the front of the lead car does hint to the BMT (the photo itself looks like it could have been taken somewhere along the Sea Beach, Brighton, or West End lines, back in the day).......

"Blimey, mate! "ere's a bloomin' go!" Wink

"NYO"


Last edited by NEW YORK OMNIBUS 2629 on Wed Nov 13, 2019 5:11 pm; edited 1 time in total
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NEW YORK OMNIBUS 2629




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PostPosted: Wed Nov 13, 2019 1:24 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Glasgow's "Tiny Tube" subway (the modern stock look even more squat than the original trains!) Shocked

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Glasgow_Subway
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NEW YORK OMNIBUS 2629




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PostPosted: Sat Nov 23, 2019 12:11 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Last evening, there was an EYEWITNESS NEWS report on a LIRR derailment at the top of the 11 o' clock broadcast.

Two cars of an eastbound MU train had derailed on elevated trackage (thankfully, no injuries)

The reporter had the cameraman focus on the two derailed cars; the reporter then said: "....as you can see, these two TRAINS are derailed....."

"TRAINS"?? Shocked Shocked Shocked Shocked

With all due respect to you, Mr. Reporter, I THINK you meant "cars"......... Rolling Eyes

"NYO"

Ironic, that, on that same date (Nov. 22nd) a massive rush hour LIRR collision at Richmond Hill claimed the lives of over 300 people.......
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