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B o T buses over the Brooklyn Bridge (trolleys not replaced)
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traildriver




Joined: 26 Mar 2011
Posts: 1129
Location: Queens, NY

PostPosted: Sat May 26, 2018 12:48 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

I recall the Standards on the J line...it was something the way those 67 foot cars overhung the sharp curves at Cypress Hills...imagine if they tried running an R-44 or 46 on it...(never happen)....
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NEW YORK OMNIBUS 2629




Joined: 18 Dec 2007
Posts: 5240
Location: NEW JOISEY

PostPosted: Sat May 26, 2018 1:50 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

traildriver wrote:
I recall the Standards on the J line...it was something the way those 67 foot cars overhung the sharp curves at Cypress Hills...imagine if they tried running an R-44 or 46 on it...(never happen)....


traildriver:

Yup!

Those beefy Standards were indeed monsters; they were inspired, in part, by the new (1912) cars that were then entering service in Boston (the last such equipment ran in Beantown in late 1963; this was six years before the last Standards were retired)

I also remember that 70's straphangers were understandably leery about the end doors being locked on the 44's and 46's, due to the dangerous gaps that would develop when the trains passed through tight curves.........not a pleasant thought, at all, to find yourself in a dangerous situation between stations, and no way to escape into another car!

Recall, too that the Standards were both motor and trailer cars; cabless trailers coupled between motor cars were designated as "BX" units.

Trailers with cabs/motorman's controls were added to the south ends of Canarsie line trains during the rush hours; these were classified as "AX" units........

"NYO"
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traildriver




Joined: 26 Mar 2011
Posts: 1129
Location: Queens, NY

PostPosted: Sat May 26, 2018 7:44 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

You hit the nail on the head, regarding being "trapped" by locked end doors.
I used to avoid riding the R-46's for that very reason on my daily commute to work. That is until a friend of mine, a motorman, err...make that a "train operator" Wink ....gave me a coach key, which I carried..."just-in-case".... Smile
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NEW YORK OMNIBUS 2629




Joined: 18 Dec 2007
Posts: 5240
Location: NEW JOISEY

PostPosted: Sat May 26, 2018 11:18 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

traildriver wrote:
You hit the nail on the head, regarding being "trapped" by locked end doors.
I used to avoid riding the R-46's for that very reason on my daily commute to work. That is until a friend of mine, a motorman, err...make that a "train operator" Wink ....gave me a coach key, which I carried..."just-in-case".... Smile


traildriver:

Indeed, it ALWAYS makes good sense to have a "back up plan" at the ready! Wink

Locked doors between cars certainly won't be a problem on those new "open gangway" cars that I have heard are forthcoming, sometime in the future.

In some sense, the ancestor of this new type car would have been BMT's "C" type cars; these looked like articulated units, but were not.

They had open passageways linking the units, which were originally open-gate cars.

The BMT rebuilt them with enclosed ends and air operated doors; they last ran on the old Fulton line in 1956.

Only the BMT, "The Playboy Of The Rails", according to subway historian Stan Fischler). ever dabbled in articulated cars; two of the articulated car types were production models.

These were the 1925 "D" type Triplex units, and the 1936 Multi Section cars.

The Multi-Sections still had a lot of "get up and go" in them when they were retired in 1961.

The Triplex cars enjoyed a longer service life, being retired in 1965.

Thankfully, examples of the famed Triplex survive today; sadly, all the Multi-Sections were scrapped........

"NYO"
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NEW YORK OMNIBUS 2629




Joined: 18 Dec 2007
Posts: 5240
Location: NEW JOISEY

PostPosted: Sat May 26, 2018 11:33 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

traildriver/all:

It is well to recall that, early in the electric rapid transit era in New York, the BRT (later the BMT) far eclipsed the INTERBOROUGH.

Though the Manhattan (INTERBOROUGH) Els were, at the time, complex and far reaching, none of them crossed over into Brooklyn.

The 2nd Avenue El (until 1942) crossed the Queensboro Bridge to serve Queens riders; this was the only Manhattan El line to cross the East River into Queens.

The BRT operated several busy El lines out of Park Row over the Brooklyn Bridge, where they then fanned out to many Brooklyn points.; the BRT also operated a massive fleet of streetcars, which burrowed into virtually every part of the borough.

The IRT itself was quite Victorian, with its cast-iron kiosks and elaborate station mosaic work, while the BMT was a heady mix of old-fashioned Els, subways, and streetcars.

The IND (which began operations in 1933) was indeed represented the very acme of modern subways, and, of course, the most up-to-date.

Though the 1948/1949 R-10's ("THE PATTONS"!) were designed for both IND/BMT service, they were cars that were far more associated with the IND than any of the BMT lines; they were the undisputed kings of the "A" line for many years.

The sleek, futuristic 1948/1949 BUDD R-11's (later rebuilt into the R-34's) were to be the prototypes for an entire new fleet of cars to serve the Second Avenue Subway (had that plan ever come to fully see the light of day!)

These cars even featured ultra-violet interior lighting, which were to kill germs (remember, polio was still greatly feared in those days)

The famed 1964 "Brightliners" were basically (IMHO) "second generation" R-11's.

The distinctive "Slant 40's", which debuted in 1968, jolted subway car design into a new and futuristic realm; I can remember they were quite "state-of-the-art" when they first hit the rails, a half-century ago........

"NYO"
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