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March 1, 1962

 
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W.B. Fishbowl



Age: 51
Joined: 02 Oct 2014
Posts: 163
Location: New York, New York, USA

PostPosted: Thu Mar 02, 2017 2:18 am    Post subject: March 1, 1962 Reply with quote

Bus drivers working for Fifth Avenue Coach Lines and its Surface Transit, Inc. subsidiary go on strike, after new management (led by wheeler-dealer Harry Weinberg) lays off 29 light duty employees in direct violation of its contract with the TWU. The strike all but ends FACL's days as operator of several bus lines in Manhattan and the Bronx; over the next few weeks the city would seize control of all bus routes heretofore operated by FACL and ST, and ultimately all depots and whatever buses weren't scurried out of town by FACL for use at its Westchester Street Lines arm, and the State Legislature would create a new agency, the Manhattan and Bronx Surface Transit Operating Authority (MaBSTOA) to administer the ex-FACL and ST routes. It is under MaBSTOA aegis that service will resume March 23, with all Bronx routes and all but 10 Manhattan routes back in service. (Two routes are all but eliminated with the onset of the strike: FACCO's route 1 from 135th Street to Washington Square which, by this point, was only operating once a day; and ST's Tenth/Eleventh Avenue M-105 whose daily schedule was likewise paced. Fifth Avenue would not see a route 1 bus go through its streets again until Jan. 14, 1966 when the ex-NYCO route 1's southbound path is shifted there between 135th and 40th Streets upon its conversion to one-way southbound and Madison Avenue's to one-way northbound.)
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Q65A



Age: 60
Joined: 17 Apr 2007
Posts: 1634
Location: Central NJ

PostPosted: Fri Mar 03, 2017 8:52 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Very good post, W.B. Fishbowl, and very significant historically. FACCO was very much a "founding father" among transit bus operators, and together with Yellow Coach/GM, they paved the way for modern urban bus transit as we know it today. Looking back, it is amazing that FACCO and their competitors were private, for-profit firms for whom bus transit was (at times) a lucrative business proposition.
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W.B. Fishbowl



Age: 51
Joined: 02 Oct 2014
Posts: 163
Location: New York, New York, USA

PostPosted: Sun Jun 18, 2017 10:18 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

It should be noted that another route, NYCO's Route 22 - Pitt and Ridge Streets was also discontinued in the wake of the strike and not resumed under MaBSTOA aegis. The other route whose nomenclature disappeared was the rush-hours only FACCo 19 - Fifth Avenue/Riverside Drive (such status in place since World War II under government edict); after the remaining ex-FACCo routes were resumed, that route was folded and absorbed into their #5, operating as usual during rush hours only until the 1980's when MaBSTOA finally discontinued that service due to low ridership (while maintaining the regular M5 route).
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